Course Offerings

Below is a list of upcoming, current, and past offerings of IT&S courses. For a list of all courses that may be applied to the emphasis visit the Program Requirements page

Winter 2021

INT 200 W - Computational Content Analysis across Disciplines: Affect, Emotion, and Meaning at Scale

A series of conceptual and operational workshops by guest leaders on computational analysis of language/meaning/effect, across disciplines.

  1. Overview and Course Objectives
  2. Sentiment analysis - Jessica Santana, TMP
  3. LIWC (Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count) - Amy Gonzales and Joe Walther, Communication
  4. BERT for NLP - William Wang, Computer Science
  5. Moral Analysis of Narratives - Rene Weber, Communication
  6. Word Embedding using word2vec in Digital Humanities - Jeremy Douglass, English
  7. NVIVO - Jon Jablonski, UCSB Library Collaboratory
  8. Wrap-up and student presentations

Speakers will be asked to address these points:

  • What can one learn by using the technique?
  • Why would someone want to use it compared to other approaches?
  • How does it work?
  • How do you make it work? (DEMO)
    • Preparation
    • Execution
    • Analysis
  • Limitations and shortcomings?
  • Best example uses/worst example of its application?

Speakers will be asked to provide 2-3 readings, including

  • One that explains how to use the system they're presenting and what its benefits are
  • One that provides an exemplary instance of its application (by you or by other[s])
  • One that critiques its use or provides a dubious example of its mis-application

Student Responsibilities:

  1. Attendance, reading in advance, submit questions online in advance of class
  2. Term paper and short presentation:
    1. Overview: Identify an original research question in your discipline (could align with your dissertation) that could benefit from TWO VERY different forms of language analysis
    2. Possible approach: Describe the research problem and its importance. Discuss a few (up to three) landmark research studies that have advanced knowledge so far, that have led to and enabled your own question; describe the methodological paradigms they employed that led to current knowledge, and the shortcomings or gaps in knowledge that (additional or new forms of) language analysis could address. Propose the application of two forms of language analysis, and whether the same or different corpuses would be beneficial. What are the benefits and what are the shortcomings of each, and how do they offer advancements?

Fall 2020

ENG 238 - Studies in Media, Technology, and Information

Contact the Professor for course description. Content of course will vary from quarter to quarter.

Professor Alan Liu

Tuesday 2:00pm - 4:20pm

SH 2635

FAMST 241 - Television and New Media Theory

Explores important theoretical writings concerning electronic and digital media. Course readings define the unique properties of these mediums, consider their ontological status, and discuss how they differ from one another and other cultural forms.

Professor Alenda Chang

Time and Location: T.B.A

 

ED 210A - Advances in the Learning Sciences and Education

Professsor Richard Duran

Survey of contemporary theoretical approaches and empirical findings in the areas of learning, instruction, cognitive processes,
situated cognition, cultural models of education, and innovative applications of information technology.

Monday 9:00am - 11:50am

ED 1205

Spring 2020

COMM 214 - Social Media

Professor Andrew Flanagin

Explores sociotechnical trends prompted by the evolution of technologies of communication and information. Using perspectives from social science, computer science, engineering, and the humanities, the course focuses on evidence, theory, and directions for future research

Wednesday  9:30am - 12:20pm

SSMS 4143

ESM 261 - Management of Scientific Data

Professor James Frew

Theory, techniques, and tools for managing heterogeneous scientific information. Database architectures and data models. Metadata standards and data characterization. Design and use of relational databases. Aspects of the science data life cycle: collection, storage, retrieval, analysis, presentation.

Tuesday 3:30pm - 4:45pm

BREN 1424

GEOG 258 - Conceptual Modeling and Programming for the Geo-Sciences

Professor K. Janowicz 

A project-based course introducing major conceptual modeling paradigms and object oriented programming from a Geoinformatics perspective. The class is intended for graduate students from Geography and the broader Geo- Sciences who have limited (or no previous) experience in software engineering.

Friday 9:00am - 11:50am

ELLSN 3620

MAT 200A - Arts and Technology

Professor Mark Peljhan 

Overview of the digital media arts field with an emphasis on technological developments and their integration in art research and production. Students are introduced to contemporary and historical directions and methodologies through seminar lectures, research presentation, and a final project.

Monday 10:00am - 12:50pm ELNGS 2003

(Lab) Tuesday 3:00pm - 3:50pm ELNGS 2003

MAT 200B - Music and Technology

Professor C. Roads

Overview of music and technology, including historical aspects. Readings and exercises with a range of music software applications. Basics of Internet audio and evolving media, music production, business, technical, and aesthetic aspects.

Tuesday/Thursday 4:00pm - 5:50pm

ELNGS 2003

SOC 248MA - Social Network Analysis

Professor Noah Friedkin

Introduction to concepts, methods, and applications of social network analysis.

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30pm - 4:50pm

PHELP 1514

TMP 273 - Technology Strategy

Professor G. Hansen

Exposes students to a broad foundation in technology management strategy research.

Monday 9:00am - 11:50am

PHELP 1315

Winter 2020

ENGL 238 - Studies in Media Technology and Information

Professor Rita Raley

Thursday 12:00PM - 2:20PM

South Hall 2623

ESM 263  - Geographic Information System

Professors James Frew

Advanced introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) theory and technology, emphasizing spatial analysis and cartographic presentation. Typical algorithms and data structures. Role of GIS in environmental information management. Integration of GIS with other analytical tools.

Monday 3:30 PM - 4:45 PM

Bren Hall 1414

FAMST 231 - Media Historiographies

Professor Greg Siegel

Comparative analysis of various historical accounts of cinema, television, and digital media that have shaped the field of film and media studies. Emphasis on issues and debates that have dominated efforts to write rigorous, methodologically explicit histories of different media.

Thursday 2:00 PM - 4:50 PM

SSMS 2303

FAMST 248 - Digital Media Theory and Practices

Professor Laila Shereen Sakr

Studies the emerging theoretical paradigms and creative practices of new media technologies including the Internet, computer games, CD-ROM, DVD, and wireless communication devices. Also examines how technologies mediate, perpetuate, and challenge social, cultural, political, and economic institutions and humanistic values.

Tuesday 2:00 PM - 4:50 PM

SSMS 2303

FAMST 267 - Media Industries

Professor Michael Curtin

The business strategies, political economy, regulatory dimensions and cultural products of contemporary media industries. A focus on the dynamics of globalization, convergence and new technologies grounds our exploration of the interconnected industrial, economic and cultural/artistic aspects of film, television, and digital media.

Friday 11:00 AM - 1:50 PM

SSMS 2013

MAT 259A - Projects in Visualizing Information

Professor George Legrady

Project-based course focused on aesthetics of algorithmic visualization. Course concentration on fundamentals of data visualization and design, with an emphasis on data query, analysis, processing and visualization in linear, 2D frequency, and spatial map visualizations

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM

Ellings Hall 2611

 

Fall 2019

INT 200 - Gateway Information Technology & Society Colloquium
Topic: Interactions with Artificial Intelligence and Algorithms

Professor Joe Walther & Associates

This year the interdisciplinary seminar will focus on human interaction with machine that are sources of information or control the delivery of information. A number of guests will help lead seminars. Topics include the nature of algorithms and questions of value in the face of logics of power; attributions about, and folk theories people use to make sense of algorithmically-determined information; factors affecting users’ acceptance of algorithmically-derived recommendations; new frameworks in the psychology of human-AI interaction; interactivity and contingency effects on conversations with machines; affective computing in the context of AI, and machine learning that supports machines’ recognition of and influence on emotions; credibility of non-human information sources.

Wednesdays 1:00 PM - 2:50 PM

SSMS 1310

ED 210A - Advances in the Learning Sciences 

Professor Duran

Mondays 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM

ED 1205

ENGL 238 - Studies in Media Technology and Information

Professor Alan Liu

Thursday 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

South Hall 2509

HIST 201HT - History of Technology

Professor Patrick McCray

Mondays 9:00 AM - 11:50 AM

HSSB 4020

MAT 200B - Music and Technology

Professor Curtis Roads

Tuesday/Thursday 4:00 PM - 5:50 PM

Music 2215

TMP 274 - Networks and Innovation

Professor Paul Leonardi

Tuesdays 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM

Phelp 1315

Spring 2019

GLOBL 223 - Global Governance, Human Rights, and Civil Society

Professor Paul Amar

This seminar focuses on the various dimensions of political, economic, and social order that arise from transnational conflict and cooperation, addressing such issues as the relations among sovereign states, market forces, civil society, and struggles for global justice.

Tuesday 3:30 PM - 6:20 PM

SSMS 2011

ED 257A  - Teaching and Learning with Digital Media

Professor Dorothy Chun

Examination of educational rationales for the design of hypermedia applications. Students evaluate existing programs and apply principles of learning with media to the development of their own projects using tools to acquire and manipulate text, images, sound and video.

Wednesday 1:00 PM - 3:50 PM

Education 1205

Winter 2019

MAT 259A - ALGORITHMIC VIS. I

Professor George Legrady

Project-based course focused on aesthetics of algorithmic visualization. Course concentration on fundamentals of data visualization and design, with an emphasis on data query, analysis, processing and visualization in linear, 2D frequency, and spatial map visualizations.

Tuesday/Thursday 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM

Elings 2611

TMP 276  - TEAM PROCESSES

Professor Kyle Lewis

In this doctoral research seminar students explore the social, cognitive, and structural dynamics of groups and teams. Both foundational and emerging research will be reviewed, including topics such as team processes (coordination, communication, reflexivity), interpersonal processes (conflict, motivation, affect, identification), and emergent processes (socially-shared cognition, transactive memory, collective intelligence).

Wednesday 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Phelps 1328

MAT 200A - Arts & Technology

Professor Marko Peljhan

Overview of the digital media arts field with an emphasis on technological developments and their integration in art research and production. Students are introduced to contemporary and historical directions and methodologies through seminar lectures, research presentation, and a final project.

Friday 10:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Ellings 2003

ESM 263  - GEOG. INFO. SYSTEMS

Professors James Frew, Will Burke

Advanced introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) theory and technology, emphasizing spatial analysis and cartographic presentation. Typical algorithms and data structures. Role of GIS in environmental information management. Integration of GIS with other analytical tools.

Monday/Wednesday 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM

Tuesday/Thursday 12 PM - 1:50 PM

Bren Hall 3035

COMM 213  - MASS MED, IND & SOC

Professor Miriam Metzger

The cognitive and social psychological effects of mass media on the individual and society. Focus is on empirical research as it informs communication theory.

Wednesday 9:30 AM - 12:20 PM

SSMS 4143

INT 200 - Gateway Information Technology & Society Colloquium
Topic: Online Hate

Professor Joe Walther & Associates

The interdisciplinary seminar focuses this year on the topic of online hate, a topic that spans our knowledge and research from computational, humanistic, social scientific, and policy perspectives. Depending on the interests of students and visiting faculty, the topic may include racist/ethnic/sexist social media postings, hate speech, hate/ideological websites and discussion fora, trolling and doxing (individual, organized, state-sanctioned, automated), “dog whistles,” harassment, uncivil discourse, cyberbullying, etc.; the crossovers of online to offline aggression; the identification, prevalence, and impact of these phenomena; how these activities are socially organized; and remediation efforts such as intervention messages (human and robotic), prejudice reduction, and cohesion-building via social media. The seminar will involve guest speakers and complement other events and speakers at the Center for Information Technology and Society throughout the year.

Thursday 2:00 PM - 3:50 PM

SSMS 1310

Fall 2018

ENGL 238 -  Studies in Media Technology and Information

Professor Alan Liu

Content of course will vary from quarter to quarter.

Thursday 2:00PM - 4:30PM

South Hall 2509

FAMST 241 -  Television and New Media Theory

Professor Cristina Venegas

Explores important theoretical writings concerning electronic and digital media. Course readings define the unique properties of these mediums, consider their ontological status, and discuss how they differ from one another and other cultural forms.

Monday 5:00PM - 7:50PM

SSMS 2013

 

MAT200B -  Music and Technology

Professor Curtis Roads

Overview of music and technology, including historical aspects. Readings and exercises with a range of music software applications. Basics of Internet audio and evolving media, music production, business, technical, and aesthetic aspects.

Tuesday/Thursday 4:00PM - 5:50PM

Music 2215

COMM 222 -  Organizational Communication

Professor Jennifer Gibbs

Classical/administrative, human relations/resources, systems, interpretive/cultural, and critical approaches to organizational communication. Theory and research on organizational structures and environments; power, authority and influence; communication networks; leadership; decision making; assimilation and socialization; innovation and change; and strategic communication.

Wednesday 9:30AM - 12:20PM

SSMS 4143

ED 210A -  Advances in the Learning Sciences and Education

Professor Richard Duran

Survey of contemporary theoretical approaches and empirical findings in the areas of learning, instruction, cognitive processes, situated cognition, cultural models of education, and innovative applications of information technology.

Monday 9:00AM - 11:50AM

Education 1205

ED 256 -  Technology and Learning Contexts

Professor Danielle Harlow

Critical consideration of research on how technology changes the learning context. Specifically, issues about how technology may be used to facilitate student learning and challenges to integrating technology.

Thursday 9:00AM - 11:50AM

Education 4205

Spring 2018

ED 202F - Literacy in the Information Age

Professor Karen J. Lunsford

Definitions of "literacy" are evolving and expanding as they and new information technologies (especially computers) are co-constructed. This course examines the political, pedagogical, and research consequences implied when traditional definitions of literacy are revised and when new literacies are introduced.

Wednesday  9:00AM - 11:50AM

ED 1205

ESM 282 - Pollution Prevention

Professor Roland Geyer

An alternative to pollution control or remediation is to prevent it in the first place. This can be achieved through increased efficiency, material and technology substitution, and reuse and recycling. This course introduces pollution prevention through theory building and case studies. It also teaches and applies pertinent concepts and tools from industrial ecology.

Tuesday/Thursday  2:00PM - 3:15PM

Bren 1424

INT 200 - Gateway Technology & Society Colloqium

Professor Joe Walther

The interdisciplinary seminar focuses this year on the topic of Fake News: the propagation of knowingly dubious and generally sensationalistic stories via social media that entice readers to select and further disseminate the stories. Sample topics and approaches may include examination of the origins of Fake News stories in forms of journalism and social media, computational underpinnings that facilitate its attraction and re-transmission, technological efforts aimed at its detection and eradication, economic incentives that motivate it, visual and language attributes that encourage readership, social network dynamics that reinforce its spread and the gratifications it serves, political and social impacts it potentially renders, qualities that characterize its relation to deception and credibility, psychological biases that resist its dismissal, legal and ethical dilemmas pertaining to its regulation, and potential effects of communication interventions designed to mitigate its influence. Students will start from a particular disciplinary/topical approach, and individually or collectively develop a literature review, call for research, and a public presentation about their research. The seminar will complement other events and speakers at the Center for Information Technology and Society throughout the year.

Monday  2:00PM - 4:50PM

SSMS 1310 (CITS Office Suite)

 

Winter 2018

CMPSC 284 - Mobile Computing

Professor Elizabeth Belding

Focuses on mobile computing. Topics may include, but are not limited to: mobile network characteristics, types of mobile networks, challenges and sollutions in mobile computing, and power conservation techniques.

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00AM-12:50PM

HFH 1132

ESM 263 - Geographic Information Systems

Professor James Frew

Advanced introduction to Geographic Information System (GIS) theory and technology, emphasizing spatial analysis and cartographic presentation. Typical algorithms and data structures. Role of GIS in environmental information management. Integration of GIS with other analytical tools.

Monday/Wednesday 12:00PM-1:50PM
or
Tuesday/Thursday    12:00PM-1:50PM

Bren 3035

FAMST 231 - Media Histories

Professor Jennifer Holt

Comparative analysis of various historical accounts of cinema, television, and digital media that have shaped the field of film and media studies. Emphasis on issues and debates that have dominated efforts to write rigorous, methodologically explicit histories of different media.

Wednesday 6:00PM-8:50PM

SSMS 2107

MAT 200A - Arts and Technology

Professor Marko Peljhan

Overview of the digital media arts field with an emphasis on technological developments and their integration in art research and production. Students are introduced to contemporary and historical directions and methodologies through seminar lectures, research presentation, and a final project.

Friday 10:00AM-2:00PM

ELNGS 2003

 

Fall 2017

MAT 200B - Music and Technology

Tuesday/Thursday 4:00PM-5:50PM

MUSIC 2215

ED 210A - Advances in Learning Sciences

Monday 9:00AM-11:50AM

ED 1207

ESM 288 - Energy, Technology, and the Environment

Tuesday/Thursday 2:00PM-3:15PM

BREN 1424

 

Winter 2017

FLMST 267 – Media Industries 

Tuesday 5:00PM-7:00PM

SSMS 2013

MAT 200A – Arts and Technology

Friday 10:00AM-12:00PM

ELNGS 2003

COMM 213 – Mass Media, the Individual, and Society

Wednesday 11:00AM-1:50PM

SSMS 4143

CMPSC 284 – Mobile Computing

Tuesday/Thursday 11:00AM-12:50PM 

PHELP 3526

ESM263 – Geographic Information System

Tuessday/Thursday 8:30AM-10:20AM Bren 3035

Tuesday/Thursday 2:30PM-4:20PM Bren 3035

POLS 267 – Political Communication

Friday 12:30PM-3:20PM

ELLSN 3814

INT 200 Technology & Society Gateway Course: "Algorithms and Culture"*

Algorithms and Culture Thurs 3:00-4:45

Thursday 3:00PM-4:45PM

SSMS 1310

*CS students who take and pass the Winter 2017 course INT 200 "Algorithms and Culture" can count these 2 units as a CS 595 course. This approval only applies to this specific instance of this course and does hence not hold for other INT 200 courses in other quarters.

 

Spring 2016

INT 200 Technology & Society Gateway Course: "Smart City, Smart Citizens?"

Wednesday 11:00AM-12:50PM

SSMS 1310

ED 221E Analyzing Ethnographic and Sociolinguistic Data

Tuesday 1:00PM-2:20PM  

ED 4205

Tuesday 3:00PM-3:50PM

ED 4211

ESM 26 - Geographic Information Systems

Tuesday/Thursday 8:00AM-10:00PM

BREN 3035

Tuesday/Thursday 2:30PM-4:00PM

BREN 3035

MAT 200C - Digital Media Technology and Engineering

Tuesday/Thursday 2:00PM-4:00PM

Elings Hall 2810

 

Winter 2016

ED 202F - Literacy in the Information Age

Wednesday 9:00AM-11:50AM

ED 1203

ENGL 236 - Studies in Literary Criticism and Theory

Thursday 3:00PM-5:30PM

South Hall 2617

FLMST 231 - Media Historiographies

Tuesday 4:00PM-6:30PM

SSMS 2017

FLMST 248 - Digital Media Theory and Practices

Monday 10:00AM-12:50PM/Wednesday 10:00AM-11:00AM

Fall 2015

ED 210A - Advances in the Learning Sciences and Education

Monday 9:00PM-11:50PM

ED 1203

ED 257A - Learning and Teaching with Digital Media for Adult Learners

Wednesday 1:00PM-3:50PM

ED 1203

ESM 288 - Energy, Technology and the Environment

Tuesday/Thursday 10:00PM-11:15PM

BREN

MAT 200A - Arts and Technology

Friday 10:00PM-2:00PM

Elings Hall 2810

MAT 200B - Music and Technology

Tuesday/Thursday 3:00PM-5:00PM

MUSIC 2215

 

Spring 2015

ED 221E - Analyzing Ethnographic and Sociolinguistic Data

Tuesday 1:00PM-3:50PM

ED 256 - Technology and Learning Contexts

Wednesday 9:00AM-11:50AM

ESM 263 - Geographic Information Systems

TBD (Contact Professor)

ESM 266 - Remote Sensing

Wednesday/Thursday 12:00PM-2:30PM

FLMST 267 - Media Industries

Wednesday 1:00PM-4:00PM

MAT 200C - Digital Media Technology and Engineering

Tuesday/Thursday 2:00PM-4:00PM

 

Winter 2014

ED 202F - Literacy in the Information Age

Wednesday 9:00AM-11:50AM

ED 257A - Teaching and Learning with Digital Media

Wednesday 1:00PM-3:50PM

ENG 236 - Studies in Literary Criticism & Theory

Tuesday 5:00PM-7:50PM

FLMST 231 - Media Historiography

Wednesday 10:00AM-12:50PM

 

Winter 2015

The Technology and Society Gateway Seminar

CMPSC 595 / FMST 595TS / POLS 595 / COMM 595

Tuesday 2:00PM-3:30PM

CITS Conference Room - SSMS 1310

COMM 213 - Mass Media, The Individual, and Society

Wednesday 12:00PM-2:50PM

ED 270A - Classrooms as Cultures

Wednesday 4:00PM-6:50PM

ESM 282 - Industrial Ecology

Monday/Wednesday 1:00PM-2:15PM

FLMST 242S - Surveillance Cultures: Special Topics in Film and Media Theory

Thursday 4:00PM-6:50PM

HIST 201HT - Advanced Historical Literature: History of Technology

Tuesday 4:00PM-6:50PM

POLS 267 - Political Communication

Wednesday 1:00PM-3:50PM

 

Fall 2014

ED 210A - Advances in the Learning Sciences

Monday 9:00AM-11:50AM

ENGL 236 - Digital Humanities -- Introduction to the Field (Studies in Literary Criticism)

Tuesday 12:30PM-3:00PM

ESM 288 - Energy, Technology, and the Environment

Monday/Wednesday 1:00PM-2:15PM

FLMST 241 - TV and New Media

Monday 10:00AM-12:50PM

GEOG 288KJ - Geospatial Semantic Web and Linked Data

Wednesday 12:30PM-1:45PM

MAT 200A - Arts and Technology

Friday 10:00AM-2:00PM

MAT 200B - Music and Technology

Tuesday/Thursday 3:00PM-5:00PM

TMP 274 NETWKS & INNOVATION Full 64568 LEONARDI P M  T 1:00pm - 3:50pm PHELP1315

 

Survey of contemporary theoretical approaches and empirical findings in the areas of learning, instruction, cognitive processes, situated cognition, cultural models of education, and innovative applications of information technology.